*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery
Treasure Fine Jewelry

*China 549-577 AD Northern Qi Dynasty Ancient Caparisoned Horse In Earthenware Pottery

Regular price $39,950.00 $0.00
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Exceedingly rare Chinese pottery caparisoned horse from the Northern Qi region.

A beautiful sculptural piece, created in China during the Northern Qi dynasty period, between the 549 and 577 AD. This horse statue is extremely finely modeled of earthenware pottery, standing in a very elegant and majestic position striding on a trapezoidal shaped base.

The animal has a gracefully arched neck to the left and its extremely well modeled. The head is adorned with a large detailed tassels of plumes and the body is embellished with a beautiful saddle and intricate harnesses. The trapping around the chest and rump is adorned with elaborated tassels and the straps are accented with multiples florets and bosses in high relief.

The surface is treated with applications of natural pigments such; red, white and others.

Has a measurements of 394 mm by 343 mm by 257 mm (15.53 x 13.52 x 10.15 Inches) (39.4 x 34.3 x 25.7 Cm).

Northern Qi,  was the successor state of the Chinese Xianbei state of Eastern Wei and was founded by Emperor Wenxuan. Emperor Wenxuan had a Han father Gao Huan (specially, he is a Xianbei in cultural conception), and a Xianbei mother, Lou Zhaojun. As Eastern Wei's powerful minister Gao Huan was succeeded by his sons Gao Cheng and Gao Yang, who took the throne from Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei in 550 and established Northern Qi as Emperor Wenxuan. Northern Qi was the strongest state out of the three main states (the other two being Northern Zhou state and Chen Dynasty) in China when Chen was established. Northern Qi however was plagued by violence and/or incompetent emperors (in particular Houzhu), corrupt officials, and deteriorating armies. In 571, an important official who guide the emperors Emperor Wucheng and Houzhu, He Shikai, was killed. Houzhu attempted to strengthen the power of throne, instead he triggered a series of purges that became violent in late 573.

In 577, Northern Qi was assaulted by Northern Zhou, a northwestern kingdom with poorer resources. The Northern Qi, with ineffective leadership, quickly disintegrated within a month, with large scale defections of court and military personnel. Both Houzhu and the last emperor Youzhu were captured, and both died in late 577. Emperor Wenxuan son Gao Shaoyi, the Prince of Fanyang, under protection by Tujue, later declared himself the emperor of Northern Qi in exile, but was turned over by Tujue to Northern Zhou in 580 and exiled to modern Sichuan. It is a matter of dispute whether Gao Shaoyi should properly be considered a Northern Qi emperor, but in any case, the year 577 is generally considered by historians as the ending date for Northern Qi.

Provenance: China Gallery, Hong Kong, HK. Marc Richards Galleries Los Angeles, California. Acquired in in February 22, 2005 Palm Beach, Florida. In our personal collection.

Collateral: This sculpture is accompanied with a certificate for thermoluminescence analysis report (TL test), from the Oxford authentication Ltd, samples, No: C204A50. Signed by Doreen Stoneham. both samples are consistent with the last firing period of 1100-1700 years ago.

Note: Two samples was taken in December 7 2004 by Phyllis Hsia PH049/541, under the head and the left buttock.

Note: Is presented in a museum base custom made of black lucite. This piece is keep safely in an especial tempered glass urn.

It is in perfect and impeccable condition, and the original pigmentation is lively.

INVENTORY REF: P0000MONNN/.1111


More from this collection