*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse
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*China 618-907 AD Tang Dynasty Ancient Earthenware Sculpture Of A Walking Horse

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Standing horse from the Tang Dynasty 618-907 AD.

Beautiful sculptural piece of art from the Chinese ancient period of the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD) featuring the finely sculptural figure of a horse, carefully made of earthenware clay pottery.

 The horse is standing in a very elegant and majestic position striding the four legs crossed. The animal has a slightly arched neck to the left looking forward and its extremely well modeled. The body is embellished with a beautiful saddle and intricate harnesses. The surface is treated with applications of natural color pigments such; white, light red and grays.

Has a measurements of 343 mm by 140 mm by 356 mm (13.5 x 5.5 x14 Inches) (34.3 x  14 x 35.6 Cm).

Tang dynasty or Tang Empire, was an imperial dynasty of China that ruled from 618 to 907, with an interregnum between 690 and 705. It was preceded by the Sui dynasty and followed by the Five Dynasties and Tend Kingdoms period. Historians generally regard the Tang as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a the golden age of cosmopolitan culture. Tang territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty.

The Li family founded the dynasty, seizing power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire and inaugurating a period of progress and stability in the first half of the dynasty's rule. The dynasty was formally interrupted during 690–705 when Empress Wu Zetian seized the throne, proclaiming the Wu Zhou dynasty and becoming the only legitimate Chinese empress regnant. The devastating An-Lushan rebellion (755–763) shook the nation and led to the decline of central authority in the dynasty's latter half. Like the previous Sui dynasty, the Tang maintained a civil-service system by recruiting scholar-officials through standardized-examination and recommendations to office. The rise of regional military governors known as Jiedushi during the 9th century undermined this civil order. The dynasty and central government went into decline by the latter half of the 9th century; agrarian rebellions resulted in mass population loss and displacement, widespread poverty, and further government dysfunction that ultimately ended the dynasty in 907.

Chinese pottery, saw many significant developments, including the first Chinese porcelain meeting both Western and Chinese definitions of porcelain, in Ding ware and related types. The earthenware Tang dynasty tomb figures  are better known in the West today, but were only made to be placed in elite tombs close to the capital in the north, between about 680 and 760. They were perhaps the last significant fine earthenware’s to be produced in China. Many are lead-glazed Sancai (three-colour) wares; others are unpainted or were painted over a slip; the paint has now often fallen off.

Collateral: An actual letter, dated October 1, 2021 from TK Asian Antiquities Gallery, signed by Michael Teller, accompanied this piece as a certificate of authenticity. Copy will be included.

Provenance: China Gallery, Hong Kong, HK. A private collection in New York city collected in the 1964; T.K. Asian Antiquities Gallery, Williamsburg Virginia; Marc Richards Galleries Los Angeles, California. China Gallery New York city. Acquired in in October 22, 2007 New York city. In our personal collection.

NoteThe surface have evidence of the typical microscopic iron detrics from the ancient firing process.

Note: The position of the legs are not usual for this type of horses sculptures from this period.

Condition: It is in very nice condition, with remains of the original colored pigments. 

INVENTORY REF: D0000TNNA/.1111


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