*Peru Pre Inca 100-700 AD Moche Pre Columbian Personified Vessel in Earth Ware pottery
*Peru Pre Inca 100-700 AD Moche Pre Columbian Personified Vessel in Earth Ware pottery
*Peru Pre Inca 100-700 AD Moche Pre Columbian Personified Vessel in Earth Ware pottery
*Peru Pre Inca 100-700 AD Moche Pre Columbian Personified Vessel in Earth Ware pottery
*Peru Pre Inca 100-700 AD Moche Pre Columbian Personified Vessel in Earth Ware pottery
*Peru Pre Inca 100-700 AD Moche Pre Columbian Personified Vessel in Earth Ware pottery
Treasure Fine Jewelry

*Peru Pre Inca 100-700 AD Moche Pre Columbian Personified Vessel in Earth Ware pottery

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Rare pre Hispanic Moche culture, pre-Inca earthenware vessel.

A beautiful interesting piece, created in the southern Peru region around the 100-700 AD by the Moche culture. This rare early period face-neck vessel has been crafted from red earth ware pottery depicting the personified body and face of a dignitary lord wearing a head cloth with royal attires and in the left hand with a baton.

The Moche portrait vessels feature a highly individualized representation of human bodies and faces that are unique from this culture. These vessels were made in two parts molds, one for the front and the other for the back. 

The Moche or Mochica civilization are the early Proto-Chimu culture that flourished in the northern coastal region of Peru with its capital near the present day Trujillo, from about the 100 to 700 AD. While this issue is the subject of some debate, many scholars contend that the Moche were not politically organized as a monolithic empire, they were likely a group of autonomous polities that shared a common culture as seen in the rich iconography and monumental architecture that survive today.

The following is textual from an investigation by Shannon Marie Trono, from the University of Miami...."About the stylistic differences in the ceramic production of “face-neck” vessels from the Middle Moche Period (400-600 CE) of the Northern and Southern Moche regions. These face-neck vessels are also referred to as effigy vessels or cántaros cara gollete in Andean ceramic classifications. Face-neck vessels take the shape of human bodies where the torso and limbs have been condensed into a large globular mass; on the neck (the spout of the vessel) appears a human face in relief. In this paper, I focus on fineware face-necks rather than utilitarian wares since the majority of the vessels in this discussion originate from monumental funerary complexes for the elite. Face-neck vessels were commonly used to holds liquids like corn beer, which was consumed in ceremonial practice".

Note: Ceramics is the most significant art form of the Moche culture, and its world of motifs is larger than that of any other ancient Peruvian culture. The Moche ceramists created both sculptural and plain paint-ornamented vessels. The most popular vessel form was the traditional stirrup spout vessel.

This piece have a measurements of 223 mm by 127 mm by 108 mm (22.3 x 12.7 x 10.8 Cm) (8.75 x 5 x 4.25 inches).

Provenance: A private collection in New York city collected in the 1964; T.K. Asian antiquities gallery, Williamsburg Virginia; a private collection in Palm Beach FL; then purchased by James & Nancy Markell, Virginia 1976; then by descent to Lauren Markland, Fort Lauderdale, FL.; acquired in Palm Beach, FL. in March 7, 2020

Note: A 1975 photographic evidence of collection can be provided.

Condition: It is in pretty good stable condition, with no missing parts, just few tiny flea bites and remains of soil.

Guarantee to be an authentic piece from the stated period and with an accurate description.

INVENTORY REF: D0000SNNV/.1111


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